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Grandma's Apron, and what Grandpa had to do with it.

Observations on feminist propaganda that was presented at a seniors fair celebrating Alberta's centennial

By Walter H. Schneider


At the October 6th, 2005 seniors fair in Andrew, Alberta, a presentation on humour opened with the following:

I don't think our kids know what an apron IS....

The principle use of Grandma's apron was to protect [pointing out the obvious, right from the dictionary definition] the dress underneath, but along with that, it served as a holder for removing hot pans from the oven.

It was wonderful for drying children's tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.

From the chicken-coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids. And when the weather was cold, grandma wrapped it around her arms. Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove.

Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron. From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls. In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron and the men knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that "old-time apron" that served so many purposes.

That plagiarized story of Grandma's Apron is based on a poem by Tina Trivett, a poem that is one of the most beautiful eulogies that were ever written, a eulogy that celebrates the life of Tina Trivetts' grandmother.  The plagiarized story based on Tina Trivett's poem has been around for years on the Internet, as have been many other abridged plagiarized versions of the story and even abridged plagiarized poems (I have yet to read one that comes close to meeting the quality of Tina Trivett's original) with the same title.

An Internet search for the write-up provides 485 entries on the search-return list [update Oct. 2007: 557 entries - for some reason google.com showed 5,000 earlier that day].  As far as popularity on the Internet goes, that is not bad but not outstanding.  However, in concert with hundreds of thousands or perhaps millions of similar sentiments expressed regarding the alleged excessive and unjust hardships imposed on women it is only a minuscule fraction of a massive, all-pervasive and unceasing feminist propaganda campaign directed at either ignoring men's plight or more often representing outright slander and vilification of men.

At least one of the web pages that sport plagiaries of Grandma's Apron has an addendum to the write-up, and I have seen that on one of the e-mail versions of the write-up that were sent to me:

Send this to those who would know, and love the story about Grandma's apron.

Remember this: "Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool; her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw."

A fairly large number of people must have received a plagiarized version of Grandma's Apron [although seldom the original poem by Tina Trivett] through e-mail messages.  Over the years I received at least three e-mail messages containing the one that was presented at the seniors fair in Andrew.

The extent of the distribution of the plagiaries of Grandma's Apron doesn't stop with that.  Printouts of the plagiaries of Grandma's Apron are being made and distributed, as were the copies of it that were handed out with the day's program at  the Oct 6, 2005 seniors fair of the County of Lamont, at the Andrew Community Hall [making the County criminally liable, even if unwittingly, while  today, in 2007, a veritable cottage industry grew out of the poem, with none of the profits from that, and without even any credit for it, going to its author, Tina Trivett].

Of course, things like those described in the plagiarized versions of Grandma's Apron are all about motherhood and apple pie.  They are the staple of good, old-time feminist propaganda, and, even though they are often corney, they make anyone get a warm feeling around the heart.  That is what makes such things so popular.  Nevertheless, they are feminist propaganda, very effective propaganda, to boot.  So it comes that things like plagiaries of Grandma's Apron replace the processes that kept alive more traditional folklore and customs, such as "Ring Around the Rosie". 

At the Lamont County seniors fair, the plagiarized story of Grandma's Apron was read to the audience as part of a presentation on the need for humour in our lives, for keeping older people healthy.  The title of that presentation was "Laugh for the Health of it", by Oe'Livia Chasse.  The presentation contained a good number of insults to men, but those insults were offered "in good humour", and such insults to men are always good for a laugh, aren't they?

I made a count of the attendance at the seniors fair in Andrew.  Women outnumbered men 79 to 19.  I commented on that at the end of the presentation about the necessity for humour, when I asked Oe'Livia Chasse to be kind to the members of the visible, very small and shrinking minority of elderly men.

When I had private discussions of my attendance count with members of the audience, some people remarked that they knew of a man or two who couldn't attend because they were out harvesting.  True, I said, but said also that they and I knew that a good number [more than half] of the women in the audience were widows.  Besides, why does a man way past his retirement age still need to be involved in harvesting? 

To make a point, we heard in the morning, just before we left the Bruderheim Seniors Centre to enter the bus for Andrew, that a neighbour of ours, Serge Lopushinsky, had died the night before.   Mr. Lopushinsky had been hauling water for his cattle.  As he went to open the gate to the cattle pasture to dump the load of water he had been carrying in his tanker truck, his truck got into motion on its own, rolled over him and killed him.  Mr. Lopushinsky, 60 years old at the time of his demise, will not attend any seniors functions.  He and what he did will not be reported on or thought of in commentaries like Grandma's Apron.

Forgive me if the plagiarized version of Grandma's Apron presented by Oe'Livia Chasse put me off a bit in the context of the attendance figures at the seniors fair in Andrew.  There were so very few elderly men in attendance at the fair because they were either working, sick in hospital or they had died, while the surviving grandmas were listening to Grandma's Apron, felt good about its message, enjoyed the preceding yoga exercises, and laughed about jokes made at the expense of men. 

Most definitely, the fact that risky men's work is far more dangerous than yoga exercises is a contributing factor to men's shorter average life span.

Therefore now I will present annotations to the plagiary of Grandma's Apron, so as to provide a bit more balance and to give credit to all to whom credit is due for the sacrifices they make for their families.

Grandma's Apron, and what Grandpa had to do with it

I don't think our kids know what an apron IS....(nor that without people like Grandpa, Grandma would most likely not have had an apron to wear.)

The principle use of Grandma's apron was to protect the dress underneath, but along with that, it served as a holder for removing hot pans from the oven. (Who grew the fibers for the cloth for Grandma's apron and dress?  Who invented and made the machinery with which the fibers were grown, harvested, processed and turned into the cloth used for Grandma's aprons and dresses?  Who designed, manufactured, and mined the material for the pots, pans and oven?  Who built the house in which the oven was and the chimney to which the oven was connected?  The answer to all of those question is: Grandpa and men like Grandpa.)

It was wonderful for drying children's tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.

From the chicken-coop (that Grandpa or his dad had built), the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks (eggs and chicks that were produced with chickenfeed that Grandpa grew) and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.

When company came (in cars that people like Grandpa had designed and manufactured, and on roads constructed by Grandpa and other men like him), those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids. And when the weather was cold, grandma wrapped it around her arms. Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove (that men like Grandpa had designed and made, and that Grandpa had installed and hooked up to the chimney that he had built).  

Chips and kindling wood (felled, hauled to the yard and chopped by Grandpa) were brought into the kitchen in that apron.  From the garden (that Grandpa had cleared and worked up), it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls. In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees (that Grandpa had planted and pruned).

When unexpected company drove up the road (in cars that men like Grandpa had designed and manufactured), it was surprising how much furniture (that men like Grandpa had made) that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch (that Grandpa had built), waved her apron and the men knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that "old-time apron" that served so many purposes [but very little, if any, of it will come about and be made to work without men doing their part and making it possible].

Feminists try, and succeeded, to indoctrinate virtually all of society into believing that women were being oppressed as far back as antiquity.  The truth, however, as is usual with just about all of what feminists claim, is totally different. 

A few years ago my wife and I discussed why the myth of the poor suffering pioneer women came into existence.  At that time we still lived on our farm and had gained during the course of our lives a good understanding of which sex it was who did the dirty and dangerous work on all family farms.  We came to the conclusion that the myth of women's suffering came into existence because history is written by the survivors.
   That conclusion was verified through the information we gathered subsequently by visiting the cemetery of the Borowitz church in Willingdon, some miles east on Highway 45 from our farm.

The first individual buried in that cemetery was not a woman who had died in childbirth or of any other causes related to being a woman.  It was a man who died on account of having been kicked by a horse whom he had attempted to shoe.  Of the couples that had been buried there over the years, the husbands predeceased their wives on average by 14 years, and a good number of husbands that were buried in double grave plots occupied only one half of their family grave, having waited already for a good number of years for their wives to come and join them.

It was women who lived in relative comfort and luxury that their fathers, brothers, husbands and sons did their best to provide.  It was boys and men who were being most brutally oppressed and exploited.  To a considerable extent that is still true today, more so for married women than for those who wish to be "equal" and go it alone [married women live on average substantially longer than their single counterparts].

That is undisputedly on the record, but, given that the education curriculum is being rigorously controlled and censored by the feminist totalitarian regime, that is not being taught anymore in our schools.   However, as the feminist flavour of the County of Lamont seniors fair showed, feminist propaganda spread out from the schools; and not just our children but now even our seniors are being indoctrinated with it.

Andrew is a dying rural town.  What I saw when I walked downtown during the lunch break leads me to believe that, although generally well-kept and somewhat beautified, the many store fronts on Main Street and side streets are facades for businesses of whom about half or more are closed down and for sale.  Two of the grocery stores I entered, one of them large enough to easily serve a community of perhaps 3,000, were in the process of serving no more than one customer each at the time. 

I understand that, as in all rural communities in Alberta, school enrolment in Andrew is down and dropping.  On account of that it can be expected that within a few years the attendance at events such as the seniors fair will be down as well, eventually being so low that such events will and can no longer be held.  Don't hold your breath for the baby-boomers.  Those moved out of rural Alberta a long time ago and raised their children the few that they had, if any at all elsewhere.
   As any census of seniors in rural Alberta shows, the population of seniors is comprised in the majority of widows.

Yes, the feminist-promoted international agenda for the planned destruction of the family has much to do with declining population numbers.  After all, feminist propaganda is not merely all-pervasive but quite literally and seriously deadly.


Epilog 2007: Ruth and I visited two more Lamont County Seniors Fairs since the one in 2005 in Andrew. The one in 2006 in the Town of Lamont still featured a blatantly discriminatory and insulting presentation by the Red-Hatters, a women-only organization run by aged feminists that promotes consumerism by women "just for the fun of it" (partying, travelling, whooping it up in hotels, eating out, etc., splurging by women but all of it without men, at least without their husbands). The presenter specifically stated that the Red-Hatters cater to women only and adamantly refuse membership to all and any men.
   When Ruth and I signed the guest book, I gave a copy of my augmented version of "Grandma's Apron" to the women of the county staff that had been the organizers of the seniors fair, while we also told them that feminist propaganda at such fairs is insulting to men in attendance and especially insulting to the memory of men who cannot attend any longer.

This year the County's seniors fair was held in the Town of Mundare. It was a relief to the very small minority of men present at the fair not to have to listen to a single presentation containing even a trace of feminist propaganda. That was even though a good number of women with red hats attended; true, a minority of the women who attended wore those red hats, but they by far outnumbered the minuscule minority of elderly men who were still alive and could attend.

God willing, Ruth and I will see at next year's seniors fair whether that many red hats prevail. However, for any man or for any woman who respects men to see a Red Hatter flaunt her in-the-face-of-men "femininity" at a seniors fair is like being spit in the face.

A comment is necessary about the vast majority of dignified women at such functions, women who do not flaunt red hats.  One of those is Sophie Baidak, in her 80s, active all of her life in the service to others - women or men - helping and aiding seniors, especially those whose health is failing.  She is a familiar sight in Lamont County, with her always being involved in pushing around some senior's wheel chair. 
   Sophie does not wear a red hat, but she most definitely enjoys her life without one.  She does not feel that she needs to make up for lost time that she never had time to lose, and she always has a joyful smile for anyone whom she knows and even for strangers. 
   Yes, Sophie is a grandmother and great-grandmother who not only wears no red hat but who never once even flaunted her apron.
   Even though recently she began to propel a wheelchair of her own now and then, Sophie still smiles and laughs.  "Sophie: many, many thanks!" and many thanks to the majority of all women; women like Sophie, like Tina Trivett, the author of the original poem "Grandma's Apron" and like Tina Trivett's grandmother who cared all of her life for her family and for much of it for her husband and their 13 children.  Tina Trivett's grandmother passed on at age 96.

_________________

See also: 

Bruderheim Seniors - Calendar of Upcoming Events


White RoseThe White Rose
Thoughts are Free

__________________
Posted 2005 10 08
Updates:
2006 03 04 (added link to Feminism for Male College Students)
2007 10 19 (added Epilog 2007)